Saint Vincent Ferrer

Saint Vincent Ferrer was born at Valencia, in Spain on the 23rd of January, 1350. He was the fourth child of the nobleman Guillem Ferrer, a notary who came from Palamós, and wife, Constança Miquel, apparently from Valencia itself or Girona.

Legends surround Vincent’s birth. It was said that his father was told in a dream by a Dominican friar that his son would be famous throughout the world. His mother is said never to have experienced pain when she gave birth to him. He was named after St. Vincent Martyr, the patron saint of Valencia. He would fast on Wednesdays and Fridays and he loved the Passion of Christ very much. He would help the poor and distribute alms to them. He began his classical studies at the age of eight, his study of theology and philosophy at fourteen.

Four years later, at the age of nineteen, Ferrer entered the Order of Preachers, commonly called the Dominican Order, in England also known as Black Friars. As soon as he had entered the novitiate of the Order, though, he experienced temptations urging him to leave. Even his parents pleaded with him to do so and become a secular priest. He prayed and practiced penance to overcome these trials. Thus he succeeded in completing the year of probation and advancing to his profession.

For a period of three years, he read solely Sacred Scripture and eventually committed it to memory. He published a treatise on Dialectic Suppositions after his solemn profession, and in 1379 was ordained a Catholic priest at Barcelona. He eventually became a Master of Sacred Theology and was commissioned by the Order to deliver lectures on philosophy. He was then sent to Barcelona and eventually to the University of Lleida, where he earned his doctorate in theology.Read More »

#MoralStory: The Elephant Rope (Belief)

A gentleman was walking through an elephant camp, and he spotted that the elephants weren’t being kept in cages or held by the use of chains.

All that was holding them back from escaping the camp, was a small piece of rope tied to one of their legs.

As the man gazed upon the elephants, he was completely confused as to why the elephants didn’t just use their strength to break the rope and escape the camp. They could easily have done so, but instead, they didn’t try to at all.

Curious and wanting to know the answer, he asked a trainer nearby why the elephants were just standing there and never tried to escape.

The trainer replied;

“when they are very young and much smaller we use the same size rope to tie them and, at that age, it’s enough to hold them. As they grow up, they are conditioned to believe they cannot break away. They believe the rope can still hold them, so they never try to break free.”

The only reason that the elephants weren’t breaking free and escaping from the camp was that over time they adopted the belief that it just wasn’t possible.

Moral of the story:

No matter how much the world tries to hold you back, always continue with the belief that what you want to achieve is possible. Believing you can become successful is the most important step in actually achieving it.

 

The God Who Stays

*

If I were You I would’ve given up on me by now
I would’ve labeled me a lost cause
Cause I feel just like a lost cause

If I were You I would’ve turned around and walked away
I would’ve labeled me beyond repair
Cause I feel like I’m beyond repair

But somehow You don’t see me like I do
Somehow You’re still here

You’re the God who stays
You’re the God who stays
You’re the one who runs in my direction
When the whole world walks away
You’re the God who stands
With wide open arms
And You tell me nothing I have ever done can separate my heart
From the God who stays

I used to hide
Every time I thought I let You down
I always thought I had to earn my way
But I’m learning You don’t work that way

My shame can’t separate
My guilt can’t separate
My past can’t separate
I’m Yours forever

My sin can’t separate
My scars can’t separate
My failures can’t separate
I’m Yours forever

No enemy can separate
No power of hell can take away
Your love for me will never change
I’m Yours forever

#ShortNews: “Welcome the fire of God’s love”

“Dear brothers and sisters, good morning!

In today’s Gospel (Lk 12:49-53), Jesus warns the disciples that the time to make a decision has come. His coming into the world, in fact, coincides with the time to make decisive choices: choosing the Gospel cannot be postponed. And to better understand His call, He uses the image of fire that He Himself came to bring to earth. Thus, He says: “I have come to set the earth on fire, and how I wish it were already blazing”…

Jesus reveals to His friends, and also to us, His most ardent desire: to bring to earth the fire of the Father’s love, which lights up life and through which, man is saved. Jesus calls us to spread this fire in the world, thanks to which, we will be recognized as His true disciples. The fire of love, lit by Christ in the world through the Holy Spirit, is a fire without limits. It is a universal fire. This has been seen since the early days of Christianity: the witness to the Gospel has spread like a beneficial fire, overcoming every division between individuals, social categories, peoples and nations. Witness to the Gospel burns. It burns every form of particularism and maintains charity open to everyone, with a preference for the poorest and the excluded.”

Read full version the translation of the address Pope Francis gave before and after praying the midday Angelus with those gathered in St. Peter’s Square, 18th Aug 2019: https://zenit.org/articles/popes-angelus-address-on-letting-jesus-fire-change-our-hearts-renew-our-lives-full-text/

#ShortNews: Muslim-Catholic committee created to promote document signed by Pope, grand imam

A new higher committee for the implementation of the Human Fraternity document has been established to promote the ideals of tolerance and cooperation contained in the Document on Human Fraternity for World Peace and Living Together.

The document, signed by Pope Francis and the Grand Imam of Al-Azhar, Ahmed el-Tayyeb, was signed in Abu Dhabi during the Pope’s visit to the UAE in February. The document invites “all persons who have faith in God and faith in human fraternity to unite and work together so that it may serve as a guide for future generations to advance a culture of mutual respect in the awareness of the great divine grace that makes all human beings brothers and sisters.”

Source: https://www.vaticannews.va/en/world/news/2019-08/committee-created-to-promote-human-fraternity-document.html

#ShortNews: At least 150 Christians arrested in Eritrea clampdown

At least 150 Eritrean Christians were arrested by government officials during the last two months, with some of them held in an underground prison made up of tunnels. Eritrea’s government current clampdown on Christians began 23 June when Eritrean security officials arrested 70 members of the Faith Mission Church of Christ, in Eritrea’s second city, Keren. The church’s members, among them 35 women and 10 children, were taken to Ashufera prison, 25kms from the city.

The Faith Mission Church of Christ was the last church still open in the majority-Muslim city 90kms northwest of Asmara. It was established more than 60 years ago and once had schools and orphanages all over the country.

On 16 August, six Christians, also from Keren and who were government employees, were taken to a court in Asmara where the judge told them to renounce their faith. The six responded by saying they would “not negotiate their faith” and would “continue following Jesus,” the source said. “Reportedly, the judge angrily told them to leave while he considers the next steps. They don’t know when to expect his decision.”

Source: https://www.worldwatchmonitor.org/2019/08/at-least-150-christians-arrested-in-eritrea-clampdown/

#LittlePilgrimage 33. Cathedral of Saint Patrick and Saint Joseph, Auckland

Sunday, 11th August 2019.

The day wasn’t went according to our plan; our skydive itinerary was canceled due to bad weather. Both me and my friend weren’t so sure if we must sad because we can’t fly above the Auckland city or must we be happy because apparently God still care about our careless decision – as again! But anyway, we were still stick with our plan to attend 4:30PM Mass at Cathedral of Saint Patrick and Saint Joseph, just walking distance from our hotel in Wyndham street.

The Cathedral of St Patrick and St Joseph (usually known as St Patrick’s Cathedral) is a Catholic church in Auckland CBD, situated on the corner of Federal Street and Wyndham St. It is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Auckland and the cathedral of the Bishop of Auckland. It was founded by Bishop Jean Baptiste Pompallier, the first Catholic bishop in New Zealand.

#LittlePilgrimage 33. Cathedral of Saint Patrick and Saint Joseph, 43 Wyndham St, Auckland CBD, Auckland 1010, New ZealandRead More »

Never Shrinking Back

“Never did I shrink from telling you what was for your own good…. I take the blame for no one’s conscience, for I have never shrunk from announcing to you God’s design in its entirety” – the words of St. Paul to his spiritual children in Ephesus as he neared the end of his life (from today’s first reading, Acts 20:17-27).

“I have made your name known to those you gave me out of the world…. I entrusted to them the message you entrusted to me.” – the words of Jesus to the Father as he neared the end of his life (from the Gospel reading, John 17:1-11a).

Will you be able to say the same thing at the end of your life?

We live in a very “polite” society. We hide the truth for the sake of being “nice”. In many cultures, being “politically correct” means “if you don’t agree with the trends in our society, you’re bad.” But Jesus gave us the Holy Spirit so that we could be his witnesses to the ends of the earth, sometimes by words, always by the holy way that we live – boldly, visibly, confidently – even if it gets us into trouble. Jesus was not always polite, and he was certainly not politically correct.

Do we really want him to be our Lord and teacher? Do we really want to follow him and imitate him?Read More »

Saint John Eudes

How little we know where God’s grace will lead. Born on a farm in northern France, Jean Eudes died at 79 in the next “county” or department. In that time, he was a religious, a parish missionary, founder of two religious communities, and a great promoter of the devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

Jean Eudes was born on 14 November 1601 on a farm close to the village of Ri to Isaac Eudes (born circa 1566) and Martha Corbin; he had four sisters and two brothers, including the historian François Eudes de Mézeray (1610-10 July 1683). He made his First Communion on 26 May 1613 (Pentecost) and at age 14 took a private vow to remain chaste.

Eudes studied under the Jesuits at Caen before he decided to join the Oratorians on 25 March 1623. His masters and models in the spiritual life were Pierre de Bérulle (who welcomed him into the order) and the contemplative and ascetic Charles de Condren. As a student of de Bérulle, he became a member of the French school that promoted a Christocentric approach to spiritual affairs. This was characterized by a strong sense of adoration, plus pursuit of a personal relationship with Jesus Christ and of the dimensions of the Holy Spirit. Bishop Jacques Camus de Pontcarré inducted Eudes into the subdiaconate on 21 December 1624.

Jean Eudes joined the religious community of the Oratorians and was ordained a priest at 24. During severe plagues in 1627 and 1631, he volunteered to care for the stricken in his own diocese. Lest he infect his fellow religious, during the plague he lived in a huge cask in the middle of a field.Read More »