#LittlePilgrimage 31. Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Chengdu, China

Last Saturday, 22nd September 2018.

It has been a while since the last time I did my Mass Mission or Little Pilgrimage. Attending local Mass (preferably in English) during my holiday, was something I enjoy. What I usually do was searched the local church location before I go and check their English Mass timing (if any). The thrill in reading the map to the church at that foreign city was unbearable, and it was such a rejoice when I finally found the church. My heart was leap for joy!

I was in my unexpected holiday expedition to China – Tibet – China from 12th to 23rd September. I did miss a Mass on 16th due to a hectic program from the travel agency. But finally we had free and easy days from 11th to 12th. I’m glad to found out they do have English Mass on Saturday, exactly on our second day of free & easy days in Chengdu.

#LittlePilgrimage 31. Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Chengdu, China, 平安桥街29号 (29 Pinganqiao), Chengdu 成都, 四川 (Sichuan) 610015

This rather small church probably was not well-known for locals. Firstly because it was a small church hiding behind few big trees, secondly catholic was not a majority in China (it is only 0.2% from the total population).

Even though Google was not 100% working in China, but the church was one of that important building you can find from Google Map. If you searched “Catholic Church Chengdu”, the map would be pointing at the exact location of the church.

The nearest Subway station to the Chengdu Catholic Church was Luomashi Station 骡马市 (exit-G). From exit, cross the street to W Yuhe Side Street then walk all the way to the west you will pass by Tianfu Expo Center, continue your walk until you meet at the T-junction between Xihuamen Street and W Yuhe Side Street, turn left to Xihuamen Street. About 100m you will find the church on you right-hand-side. And you will be greeted by Our Mother Mary at the gate.

Not much information can be found about the church. But here are some information for you;

It was a Roman Catholic Cathedral, following the Roman Rite order of the Mass.

English Mass is on every Saturday, 4PM.

Phone 28-6634192

Here’s wiki for the church; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Catholic_Diocese_of_Chengdu

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Who Am I? (Meditation)

Fr Richard Rohr’s Daily Meditation

Forgive me, if this seems too harsh, but it seems to me that much of religion has become a preoccupation with forms rather than with substance. People like Augustine of Hippo, Teresa of Avila, Thomas Merton, and Karl Rahner tell us that the discovery of our deepest self and the discovery of God should be the same discovery. That’s why good spirituality and good psychology operate well together.

Too much of both religion and common therapy seem to be committed to making people comfortable with what many of us call our “false self.” It’s just rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic, which is going to sink anyway. To be rebuilt from the bottom up, you must start with the very ground of your being. The spiritual path should be about helping you learn where your true ground, your deepest truth, and your eternal life really are. Our common phrase for that is “finding your soul.”

I believe that God gives us our soul—our deepest identity, our True Self, our unique blueprint—already at our very conception. Our unique little bit of heaven is installed by the Manufacturer at its beginning! We are given a span of years to discover it, to choose it, and to live our own unique destiny to the full. The discovery of our own soul is frankly what we are here for.Read More »

Saint Gregory of Nazianzus

Saint Gregory of Nazianzus, (born c. 330, Arianzus, near Nazianzus, in Cappadocia, Asia Minor [now in Turkey]—died c. 389, Arianzus; Eastern feast day January 25 and 30; Western feast day January 2), 4th-century Church Father whose defense of the doctrine of the Trinity (God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit) made him one of the greatest champions of orthodoxy against Arianism.

Gregory’s father, also named Gregory, was converted to the Christian faith from the monotheistic sect known as the Hypsistarii under the influence of his Christian wife. He was soon afterward consecrated bishop of his native city, Nazianzus in 325. Born some years later, the younger Gregory thus grew up in a Christian and clerical family. Nevertheless, he received a classical as well as religious education, studying first at Caesarea, the provincial capital, at least briefly at Alexandria, and finally at Athens (c. ad 351–356). He was a close friend of Basil, his fellow student and later bishop of Caesarea, and in his panegyric at Basil’s death in 379 he gave a vivid picture of student life of the period. Among Gregory’s other contemporaries as a student at Athens was the future Roman emperor Julian, who in his brief two-year reign would attempt to revive paganism. Soon after returning to Cappadocia, Gregory joined the monastic community that Basil had founded at Annesi in Pontus. During this time, in order to preserve the thought of the great Alexandrian theologian Origen, many of whose speculative views were under attack, the two friends collaborated in editing the Philocalia, an anthology of theological and devotional selections from the works of Origen.Read More »

Canticle of the Sun

*

The heavens are telling the glory of God,
and all creation is shouting for joy.
Come, dance in the forest,
come, play in the field,
and sing, sing to the glory of the Lord.

Praise for the sun, the bringer of day,
He carries the light of the Lord in his rays;
The moon and the stars who light up the way
Unto your throne.

Praise for the wind that blows through the trees,
The seas mighty storms, the gentlest breeze;
They blow where they will, they blow where they please
To please the Lord.

Praise for the rain that waters our fields,
And blesses our crops so all the earth yields;
From death unto life her myst’ry revealed
Springs forth in joy.

Praise for the fire who gives us his light,
The warmth of the sun to brighten our night;
He dances with joy, his spirit so bright,
He sings of you.

Praise for the earth who makes life to grow,
The creatures you made to let your life show;
The flowers and trees that help us to know
The heart of love.

Praise for our death that makes our life real,
The knowledge of loss that helps us to feel;
The gift of yourself, your presence revealed
To lead us home.

*Read More »

#ShortNews: Blood of St. Januarius liquefies in annual miracle

The miracle takes place on the anniversary of the martyrdom of San Gennaro (St. Januarius) in September 305 AD.

The first historical reference to the liquefaction of the martyr’s blood is dated 1389. Although now a headline-making saint, little is known about San Gennaro except that he was bishop of Benevento to the south of Naples and was martyred during the persecution of Christians spearheaded by the Roman Emperor Diocletian. According to legend, his body and head, still dripping blood, were gathered up by an old man and taken to a safe place while a local woman filled a phial with his spilt blood.

The dried blood of the saint is preserved in two glass phials and traditionally liquefies three times a year, the Church says, thanks to the devotion and prayers of the faithful. The liquefaction process sometimes takes hours, even days, and on occasions fails to happen at all.

Read full story: http://www.ansa.it/english/news/general_news/2018/09/19/bishop-falls-ill-at-san-gennaro-miracle_b2c86944-8b2b-4be7-85db-380e7866672d.html