Saint Nino of Georgia

Virgin and the Apostle of Georgia, also listed as Christiana. According to custom, she was born in Cappadocia and became a slave. Taken to Iberia, she won the respect of many locals with her patience and goodness and by the miracles she supposedly performed. Brought to the royal palace, she converted the king and queen who then requested that the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great send missionaries and bishops. After helping to found the Church in Georgia, Nino retired to the life of a hermitess, spending the rest of her life in prayer. While there is no doubt about her historical existence or her work, Nino has been the subject of numerous tales and legends.

Many sources agree that Nino was born in the small town of Colastri, in the Roman province of Cappadocia, although a smaller number of sources disagree with this. On her family and origin, the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church have different traditions.

According to the Eastern Orthodox Church tradition, she was the only child of a famous family. Her father was Roman general Zabulon and her mother Sosana (Susan). On her father’s side, Nino was related to St. George, and on her mother’s, to the patriarch of Jerusalem, Houbnal I.

During her childhood, Nino was brought up by her relative, the nun Sarah Bethlehemlianka. Nino’s uncle who was as the patriarch of Jerusalem oversaw her traditional upbringing. Nino went to Rome with the help of her uncle where she decided to preach the Christian gospel in Iberia, known to her as the resting place of Christ’s tunic. According to the legend, Nino received a vision where the Virgin Mary gave her a grapevine cross and said:

“Go to Iberia and tell there the Good Tidings of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and you will find favour before the Lord; and I will be for you a shield against all visible and invisible enemies. By the strength of this cross, you will erect in that land the saving banner of faith in My beloved Son and Lord.”

Saint Nino entered the Iberian Kingdom in Caucasus from the Kingdom of Armenia, where she had escaped prosecution at the hands of the Armenian King Tiridates III. She had belonged to a community of virgins numbering 37, along with martyr Hripsime, under the leadership of St. Gayane, who preached Christianity in the Armenian Kingdom. But they were persecuted and beheaded by King Tiridates. All 37 of the virgins were soon canonised by the Armenian Apostolic Church including St. Nune (St. Nino).

Contrasting with this, the Roman Catholic tradition, as narrated by Rufinus of Aquileia, says Nino was brought to Iberia not by her own will, but as a slave, and that her family tree is obscure.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s