Seraphim

Biblical Sceneseraph (/ˈsɛr.əf/; pl. seraphs or seraphim /ˈsɛr.ə.fɪm/; Hebrew: שְׂרָפִים śərāfîm, singular שָׂרָף śārāf; Latin: seraphi[m], singularseraph[us]; Greek: σεραφείμ) is a type of celestial or heavenly being in the Abrahamic religions. Seraphim are the highest order or choir of angels. They are the angels who are attendants or guardians before God’s throne.

The root of Seraphim comes either from the Hebrew verb saraph (‘to burn’) or the Hebrew noun saraph (a fiery, flying serpent). Because the term appears several times with reference to the serpents encountered in the wilderness (Num. 21.8, Deut. 8.15; Isa. 14.29; 30.6), it has often been understood to refer to “fiery serpents.” From this it has also often been proposed that the seraphim were serpentine in form and in some sense “fiery” creatures or associated with fire.

In Holy Writ these angelic beings are distinctly mentioned only in Isaias’s description of his call to the prophetical office (Isaiah 6:2 sqq.). In a vision of deep spiritual import, granted him in the Temple, Isaias beheld the invisible realities symbolized by the outward forms of Yahweh’s dwelling place, of its altar, its ministers, etc. While he stood gazing before the priest’s court, there arose before him an august vision of Yahweh sitting on the throne of His glory. On each side of the throne stood mysterious guardians, each supplied with six wings: One pair of wings are for flying, one for covering their eyes (for even they may not look directly at God), and one for covering their feet (which is almost certainly a euphemism for genitalia). They are in the direct presence of God. His highest servants, they were there to minister to Him and proclaim His glory, each calling to the other: “Holy, holy, holy, Yahweh of hosts; all the earth is full of His glory.” These were seraphim, one of which flew towards Isaias bearing a live coal which he had taken from the altar, and with which he touched and purified the Prophet’s lips, that henceforth these might be consecrated to the utterances of inspiration.

Although described under a human form, with faces, hands, and feet (Isaiah 6:2, 6), they are undoubtedly existing spiritual beings corresponding to their name, and not mere symbolic representations as is often asserted by advanced Protestant scholars. Their number is considerable, as they appear around the heavenly throne in a double choir and the volume of their chorus is such that the sound shakes the foundations of the palace.

It is said that whoever lays eyes on a Seraph, he would instantly be incinerated due to the immense brightness of the Seraph.

Some of the Seraphim are Metatron, Kemuel, Nathanael, Gabriel, and Lucifer.