#MoralStory: The Human Touch

I had spent an hour in the bank with my dad, as he had to transfer some money.  I couldn’t resist myself and asked, “Dad, why don’t we activate your internet banking?”

“Why would I do that?” he asked.

“Well, then you won’t have to spend an hour here for things like transfer. You can even do your shopping online. Everything will be so easy!” I was so excited about initiating him into the world of Net banking.

He asked ”If I do that, I won’t have to step out of the house?

“Yes, yes!” I said. I told him how even grocery can be delivered at door now and how Amazon delivers everything!

His answer left me tongue-tied. He said ”Since I entered this bank today, I have met four of my friends, I have chatted a while with the staff who know me very well by now. You know I m alone…this is the company that I need. I like to get ready and come to the bank. I have enough time; it is the physical touch that I crave. Two years back I got sick, the store owner from whom I buy fruits, came to see me and sat by my bedside and cried. When your elder brother fell down few days back while on his morning walk, our local grocer saw him and immediately got his car to rush him home as he knows where I live. Would I have that ‘human’ touch if everything became online? Why would I want everything delivered to me and force me to interact with just my computer? I like to know the person that I’m dealing with and not just the ‘seller’ . It creates bonds. Relationships. Does Amazon deliver all this as well?”

Technology isn’ t life. Don’t be a keyboard warrior. Spend time with people, not with devices.

Trinity Song – by Sandra McCracken

*

Holy Father, Son and Spirit
Holy Communion, three-in-one
Holy Father, Son and Spirit
Holy Communion, three-in-one

Come with your peace, with your invitation
Bind us together in Holy Love
Come with your peace, with your invitation
Bind us together in Holy Love

Holy Father, Son and Spirit
Holy Communion, three-in-one
Holy Father, Son and Spirit
Holy Communion, three-in-one

Come with your peace, with your invitation
Bind us together in Holy Love
Come with your peace, with your invitation
Bind us together in Holy Love

*Read More »

#ShortNews: Pope beatifies 7 Romanian Greek Catholic bishop-martyrs

All seven of the Greek-Catholic bishops were arrested in 1948. All of them were imprisoned and left to die of hunger, exposure, disease, or the effects of hard labour, and then buried in unmarked graves. The liturgical chair used during the Divine Liturgy in Blaj on Sunday, was made from the wooden planks of the prison beds, and from the iron bars of the prison windows where some of the martyrs died.

Iuliu Hossu, a theology student in Rome. He spent 22 years in prison. His last words were: “My battle is over, yours continues”. He never knew that Pope Paul VI had created him a Cardinal “in pectore” in 1969.

Vasile Aftenie, a theology student in Rome. A year after his arrest he was transferred to the infamous Ministry of the Interior where he suffered terrible tortures and eventually died of his wounds in 1950.

Ioan Balan, in 1929 Ioan Balan was appointed to the Vatican Commission to draw up the new Code of Canon Law of the Eastern Churches. After his arrest in 1948, he was placed in solitary confinement and died in 1959 without ever being tried or sentenced.

Valeriu Traian Frentiu, was ordained a bishop when he was only 37 years of age. Also arrested in 1948, he spent the rest of his life in a concentration camp. When he died in 1952, his body was thrown into an unmarked grave.

Ioan Suciu, was ordained a priest in 1931. He too died of hunger and disease while in prison. In his last letter to the faithful before his arrest, he wrote: “Do not be deceived by vain words, promises, lies… We cannot sell Christ or the Church”.

Tito Liviu Chinezu, was ordained a bishop in prison by those bishops who were themselves prisoners. When the secret of his ordination leaked out, he was transferred to a prison where he died of cold and hunger.

Alexandru Rusu, was consecrated bishop in 1931. Arrested in 1948, he was sentenced to 25 years in prison for instigation and high treason. He died in 1963 and was buried in the prison cemetery without any religious rite.

Source;

https://www.vaticannews.va/en/pope/news/2019-06/pope-francis-romania-beatification-7-greek-catholic-martyrs.html

https://www.americamagazine.org/faith/2019/06/02/joyous-celebration-romania-pope-francis-beatifies-seven-bishop-martyrs

#ShortNews: Birth control, divorce, premarital sex deemed ‘morally acceptable’ by majority of Americans

Americans have increasingly taken a more liberal view on many of them since then. The latest reading, from a May 1-12 poll, shows that at least 60% of Americans find 10 of the behaviors to be morally acceptable. In addition to birth control (92%), alcohol use (79%), and divorce (77%), sex between unmarried men and women (71%), gambling (68%), smoking marijuana (65%), embryonic stem cell research (64%), having a baby outside of marriage (64%), gay or lesbian relations (63%) and the death penalty (60%) round out that list.

At the other end of the spectrum, there are seven behaviors that fewer than four in 10 Americans deem morally acceptable, including teenage sex (38%), pornography (37%), cloning animals (31%), polygamy (18%), suicide (17%), cloning humans (12%) and extramarital affairs (9%).

The issues that divide Americans most closely are buying and wearing clothing made of animal fur, doctor-assisted suicide, medical testing on animals and abortion. On each, the gap between “morally acceptable” and “morally wrong” views is less than 10 percentage points.

Study more about the other percentages and the changes in ideology here; https://news.gallup.com/poll/257858/birth-control-tops-list-morally-acceptable-issues.aspx

#ShortNews: Iraqi Christians face an impossible choice

The call came in 2014, shortly after Easter. Four years earlier, Catrin Almako’s family had applied for special visas to the United States. Catrin’s husband, Evan, had cut hair for the U.S. military during the early years of its occupation of Iraq. Now a staffer from the International Organization for Migration was on the phone. “Are you ready?” he asked. The family had been assigned a departure date just a few weeks away.

“I was so confused,” Catrin told me recently. During the years they had waited for their visas, Catrin and Evan had debated whether they actually wanted to leave Iraq. Both of them had grown up in Karamles, a small town in the historic heart of Iraqi Christianity, the Nineveh Plain. Evan owned a barbershop near a church. Catrin loved her kitchen, where she spent her days making pastries filled with nuts and dates. Their families lived there: her five siblings and aging parents, his two brothers.

But they also lived amid constant danger. “Everybody who was working with the United States military—they get killed,” Catrin said. Evan had been injured by an explosion near a U.S. Army base in Mosul in 2004. Catrin worried about him driving back and forth to the base along highways that cross some of the most contested land in Iraq. Even after he stopped working for the military, they feared he might be a victim of violence. That fear was compounded by their faith: During the war years, insurgents consistently targeted Christian towns and churches in a campaign of terror.

The Almakos had watched neighbors and friends wrestle with the same question: stay, or go?

Read full story here: https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2019/05/iraqi-christians-nineveh-plain/589819/

Trinity as Evolutionary Principle

Guest writer and CAC teacher Cynthia Bourgeault continues exploring Trinity and the Law of Three.
“The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting—it has been found difficult and left untried.” —G. K. Chesterton

While Richard and I speak in different ways about the Trinity, and no doubt to slightly different audiences, I think we share a common underlying vision. The key to reawakening the power of this primordial Christian symbol, we both believe, lies in shifting the Trinity away from an abstract theological speculation on the inner life of God and re-imagining it as a pattern in the very fabric of reality—a template that is coded into all of creation.

Post-Einsteinian physics demonstrates that life is not static, but dynamic. As our theological paradigm shifts away from a static universe to a universe in perpetual motion, the whole Trinitarian frame shifts with it. Like a key clicking into place, the Trinity reveals itself as a metaphysical code that unlocks theology and science and illustrates a fresh understanding of a creative and contemplative engagement in the world.Read More »

Saint Louise de Marillac

Louise was born near Le Meux, now in the department of Oise, in Picardy, into a wealthy French family in 1591, but all the money in the world could not stop sadness from touching her life. Her mother died when was young and her father died when she was a teenager. She was raised by her aunt, a nun, and Louise felt called to religious life. She later made application to the Capuchin nuns in Paris but was refused admission. It is not clear if her refusal was for her continual poor health or other reasons, but her spiritual director assured her that God had “other plans” for her.

Devastated by this refusal, Louise was at a loss as to her next step. When she was 22, her family convinced her that marriage was the best alternative. Her uncle arranged for her to marry Antoine Le Gras, secretary to Queen Marie. Antoine was an ambitious young man who seemed destined for great accomplishments. Louise and Antoine were wed in the fashionable Church of St. Gervaise on February 5, 1613. In October, the couple had their only child, Michel. Louise grew to love Antoine and was an attentive mother to their son. Along with being devoted to her family, Louise was also active in ministry in her parish. She had a leading role in the Ladies of Charity, an organization of wealthy women dedicated to assisting those suffering from poverty and disease.

During civil unrest, her two uncles who held high rank within the government were imprisoned. One was publicly executed, and the other died in prison. Around 1621, Antoine contracted a chronic illness and eventually became bedridden. Louise nursed and cared for him and their child. In 1623, when illness was wasting Antoine, depression was overcoming Louise. In addition, she suffered for years with internal doubt and guilt for having not pursued the religious calling she had felt as a young woman. She was fortunate to have a wise and sympathetic counsellor, Francis de Sales, then in Paris, and then his friend, the bishop of Belley.Read More »